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Kyocera cuts energy use with Green Curtains

Electronics manufacturer grows plants on buildings to reduce energy use, absorb carbon dioxide

David Kuack | August 26, 2010

Electronics manufacturer Kyocera Group is growing vining plants to form “Green Curtains”, which cover trellises to shade the windows and outer walls of its manufacturing and office buildings at 20 locations in Japan, Thailand and Brazil. The curtains create a screen over the windows, preventing direct sunlight from raising the buildings’ interior temperature reducing energy loads on air-conditioners. The plants also help preserve the environment by absorbing carbon dioxide.
The year, the Green Curtains being grown at the company’s various locations cover a total area of 32,750 sq. ft., which is an increase of nearly 4 times the area covered last year. The Green Curtains have been estimated to absorb 23,481 lbs. during their annual growth cycle.
The goya (bitter gourd), cucumbers and peas that form the Green Curtains are harvested by Kyocera employees and commonly served as part of a special lunch menu in the employee cafeterias.
The company has also created a website with do-it-yourself instructions to help encourage more people to take up the eco-friendly project at their own homes and businesses.

Pictured: Kyocera Group is growing vining plants on trellises to shade windows and outer walls of its buildings to reduce energy loads.

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