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Mailorder Gardening Association changes its name

Direct Gardening Association name better reflects activities of specific gardening industry segment

David Kuack | January 17, 2011

The Mailorder Gardening Association, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing support, education and information to its member gardening companies, has changed its name to the Direct Gardening Association.
 “Our goal for the new association name is to reflect the full range of ways DGA members sell products directly to consumers, from catalogs to websites, social media to mobile commerce,” said DGA president Valerie Gosset of Evergreen Marketing. “The breadth of education and networking opportunities DGA provides encompasses all this and more.”
DGA, headquartered in Elkridge, Md., is the largest nonprofit association of gardening companies selling to consumers via print catalog and online.
DGA sponsors an annual awards program called the Green Thumb Awards. The awards recognize outstanding new garden products available in catalogs or online. Winning products are selected based on their uniqueness, technological innovation, ability to solve a gardening problem or provide a gardening opportunity and potential appeal to gardeners.
 

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