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Rising demand for grafted vegetables related to methyl bromide phaseout

Industry News

Agricultural demand for grafted vegetables with rootstocks that naturally resist soil-borne diseases is skyrocketing. Ironically, this agricultural demand may be surpassed by interest from home vegetable growers.

| December 10, 2013

Nine years after the phaseout of the use of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant was phased out in Jan. 1, 2005, pursuant to U.S. obligations under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and the Clean Air Act. Until recently, the 100 percent phaseout allowed variances such as critical use exemptions agreed to by the Montreal Protocol Parties. As pressure tightens to do away with these exemptions, agricultural demand for grafted vegetables with rootstocks that naturally resist soil-borne diseases is skyrocketing. Ironically, this agricultural demand may be surpassed by interest from home vegetable growers.

 
As the nation’s gardeners begin a clamor for organic and local sources of food, many have opted to grow their own. While the downturn in the economy has encouraged this as a practical consideration, additional stimulus has come from health concerns over GMO’s and toxins found in the average American diet. Throw in the impetus from the superior taste of homegrown veggies and the trend to grow-your-own vegetables is quickly becoming a movement.
 
In response to the demand for grafted inputs, SuperNaturals Grafted Vegetables is now offering over 100 varieties of grafted plants to the growers for retailers across the country. In addition to tomatoes, peppers and eggplant, the company is offering grafted varieties of watermelon, cucumber and cantaloupe for 2014.
 
As a licensed grower of the SuperNaturals brands, Mighty ‘Mato and Mighty Veggies, the Plug Connection in Vista, CA plans to ship between one and three million starter plants to retail growers and farmers across the country. Plug Connection will produce 100% of the crop as certified organic and offer free shipping on tomatoes, peppers and eggplant within the contiguous 48 states.
 
 A current list of varieties offered is available.  

 

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